Our Family
Genealogy Pages

Home Page  |  What's New  |  Photos  |  Histories  |  Headstones  |  Reports  |  Surnames
Search
First Name:


Last Name:



Marie Egmond (Von Gelden), of Gueldres

Female 1433 - 1463  (30 years)


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Marie Egmond (Von Gelden) 
    Suffix of Gueldres 
    Born 1433  Duchy Of Gueldres Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Died 16 Nov 1463  Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Holy Trinity Kirk, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I66  Ghillebride
    Last Modified 23 Dec 2020 

    Family James II Stewart, King of Scotland,   b. 16 Oct 1430, Holyrood Palace, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Aug 1460, Roxburgh Castle, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 29 years) 
    Married 3 Jul 1449  Holyrood Abbey, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 24 Aug 2015 
    Family ID F29  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • 1 - The Queen Mother and Bishop Kennedy of St Andrews acted as guardians, after the accession of James III at age nine in 1460, but in 1461, seizing his opportunity as he thought, Edward IV of England negotiated with John, successor to Alexander as Lord of the Isles and Earl of Ross, to attack from the north, while the attainted Earl of Douglas backed by English forces attacked from the south. The attempt failed when Douglas was defeated in 1463 by a force led by Bishop Kennedy. A truce with England was then concluded in 1464.

      2 - Amongst Scottish reminiscences which do not extend beyond our own recollections we may mention the disappearance of Trinity Church in Edinburgh, which has taken place within the last quarter of a century. It was founded by Mary of Gueldres, queen of James II. of Scotland, in 1446, and liberally endowed for a provost, prebendaries, choristers, etc. It was never completed, but the portions built, viz., choir, transept, and central tower, were amongst the finest specimens of later Gothic work in Scotland. The pious founder had placed it at the east end of what was then the North Loch. She chose her own church for the resting-place of her remains as a sanctuary of safety and repose. A railway parliamentary bill, however, overrides founder