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1  MacDougall, Alan of Dunollie, 10th Chief of clan (I6409)
 
2  MacDougall, Sir John of MacDougall, 11th of Dunollie (I3553)
 
3  Macdonell, Angus (Aeneas) 9th of Glengarry, Lord Macdonell (I24534)
 
4 7th Chief ravished and afterwards m Helen, widow ot two other Highland chiefs, Maclain of Ardnamurchan and MacLaine of Lochbuie {qv) and dau of Sir Colin Campbell of Glenorchy, which relationship was no doubt the reason why the CAMPBELLs advancd him to the chiefship, Campbell, Helen (I3549)
 
5 7th Chief ravished and afterwards m Helen, widow ot two other Highland chiefs, Maclain of Ardnamurchan and MacLaine of Lochbuie {qv) and dau of Sir Colin Campbell of Glenorchy, which relationship was no doubt the reason why the CAMPBELLs advancd him to the chiefship, Campbell, Helen (I3549)
 
6 Alexander Stuart, Esq. (1st Baron of Galstoun and Dreghorn), who was born circa 1435 and was granted Dreghorn (13 May 1450) and Galstoun by his elder brother. He is said to have been the ancestor of Col. William Stuart, father of Frederick, fist Lord Pittenweem (created 1609). Stuart [Stewart], Alexander 1st of Galstoun and Dreghorn (I563)
 
7 In November of 1440 the 6th Earl and his brother, David, were guests of the King in Edinburgh Castle. After dining with the King both Douglases were seized by Crichton and his allies, hastily tried for treason and immediately executed. It is
said that as the last course of the meal Crichton set a black bull's head in front of the doomed brothers as a symbol of their impending death. For this reason the event earned the name of the "Black Bull's Dinner" 
Douglas, David (I694)
 
8 It was not uncommon for a highland chief to provide for his younger sons by ceding lands to them at the outermost limits of his sphere of influence. In this manner the chief could insure his own security and provide a heritable property for hs son.
This no doubt was the strategy of the Laird of Freuchie in the late 15th century, when he is said to have provided his grandson, William Grant, with the lands of Blairfindy in the wilds of Glenlivet. Although not far removed, as the crow flies, from the friendly environs of the chief's stronghold in Strathspey, Glenlivet would have been a desolate, remote setting for young William to establish his ?i?duchas ?/i?(heritable property). Even today, Glenlivet is considered "off the beaten path."
William Grant - obviously a person of some import - was noted in a Royal Remission dated February 13, 1527. He may have also been the same William Grant who witnessed a charter in 1534. 
Grant, William 1st of Blairfindy (I31138)
 
9 It was not uncommon for a highland chief to provide for his younger sons by ceding lands to them at the outermost limits of his sphere of influence. In this manner the chief could insure his own security and provide a heritable property for hs son.
This no doubt was the strategy of the Laird of Freuchie in the late 15th century, when he is said to have provided his grandson, William Grant, with the lands of Blairfindy in the wilds of Glenlivet. Although not far removed, as the crow flies, from the friendly environs of the chief's stronghold in Strathspey, Glenlivet would have been a desolate, remote setting for young William to establish his  
Grant, William 1st of Blairfindy (I31138)
 
10 John was present at Inverness in 1485 when Angus ?g of the Isles was assassinated by an Irish harper. His name is given as 'John Allanson in Mamore in 1492, and he appears in other rentals down to 1528. His descendants are known as 'Sliochd Ian mhic Ailein' ('Race of John, son of Allan'). Cameron, John Allanson (I64685)
 
11 "Burke's Peerage & Baronetage" 107th edn. pub.2003, Strathspey of Strathspey, Chief of GRANT, vol.3, p.3785, names this guy as John 'Am Bard Ruadh' (The Red Bard).
[E-mail from Peter Wood rec: 25 Jun 2016] 
Grant, John 'am Bard Ruadh' 2nd of Freuchie (I19994)
 
12 "Burke's Peerage & Baronetage" 107th edn. pub.2003, Strathspey of Strathspey, Chief of GRANT, vol.3, p.3785, names this guy as John 'Am Bard Ruadh' (The Red Bard).
[E-mail from Peter Wood rec: 25 Jun 2016] 
Grant, John 'am Bard Ruadh' 2nd of Freuchie (I19994)
 
13 (Medical):A Mute Stewart, Joan "the Dumb Lady" (I1563)
 
14 (Medical):The Battle of Aldy Charrish (also known as the Battle of Auldicharish, Aldicharrish, Aldecharwis, Alt a'Charrais, Alt Charrais, Alt na Charrais) was a Scottish clan battle that took place on 11 July 1487. The Clan Mackay and Clan Sutherland defeated the Clan Ross and their allies in the Scottish Highlands, probably on the south side of Strathoykel. Ross, William of Little Allan, 1st of Shandwick (I30432)
 
15 (possibly a daughter of Stewart of Lorn) Stewart, dau. (I29642)
 
16 ***** Farhat, Betty J. ***** Farhat, Betty J. 68, who lived previously in DeWitt, died on Tuesday, November 19, 2002 in Las Vegas, Nevada after a brief illness. She was born on February 23, 1933 and is survived by her husband Dale, daughter Mischelle Farhat-Codde of DeWitt, son James J. Farhat of Lansing and son Jeffrey S. Farhat who now lives in Las Vegas with Dale. Also surviving are her five grandchildren, Michael Carty, Jennifer Tschirhart, Lori Tschirhart, Christopher Codde, and Jeffrey Codde, two great-grandchildren, step-mother Dorothy Lamar of DeWitt, son-in-law Joseph Codde of DeWitt, sister-in-law Evon Stafford of Green Valley, Arizona, brother-in-law George Farhat of Las Vegas, Nevada, and many nieces and nephews.
She preceded in death by her mother and father, Jessie and James Lamar, sister Elizabeth Henry, brother James Lamar, and daughter Terry Harris.
Betty married Dale Farhart on February 28, 1964 in Lansing and together they managed Leon's Home Made Foods, Inc. before retiring to Las Vegas, Nevada. Betty will be fondly remembered for her outgoing and vibrant personality, her commitments to family and friends, and devotion to her husband Dale.
They shared a wonderful life togethe. She was also an extraordinary friend to many special people who will miss her 
LAMAR, Betty Joy (I133415)
 
17 ***** June E. Mc Daniel ***** June E. McDaniel, 74 of Mulliken, Michigan, died Friday evening, January 8, 1999 at her home following a long illness. Mrs. McDaniels was born June 27, 1922 in Mulliken, a daughter of Carl and Marguerite (Crane) Peabody. She was a retired secretary with the Grand Ledge Public Schools and a member of the Mulliken United Methodist Church.
Surviving are her husband of 51 years, Russell; four children, Richard McDaniels, Jean Ann (Jacobus) Homan, Gary (Beverly) McDaniels and Ron (Suana) McDaniels; 9 grandchildren; two sisters, Martha Ann (Bob) Loveland and Marilyn (Ron) Krupp; two brothers, Fred (June) Peabody and James (Norma) Peabody; several nieces and nephews, and a host of friends. Interment was in Meadowbrook Cemetery. 
PEABODY, June Elaine (I133377)
 
18 ***** Morrice, Michigan ***** Richard J. Letts born May 15, 1936 in Lansing, Michigan; died September 12, 1995 at the age of 59. Mr. Letts was preceded in death by his wife Mary Lou (1975); 1 son, Richie; his parents, Willie and Tad Lettis, and 2 sisters, Sandy and Helen; and 1 brother, Terry.
Surviving are 2 daughters, Cathy (Warren) Stevenson of Florida and Sue Letts of Lansing, 4 grandchildren; 1 brother Don (linda Letts of Maryland; 3 sisters, Garnie (Gary) McDaniel of Harrison, Kate (Jerry) Rattay and Diane Letts, both of Lansing; 1 brother -in-Law, Doug (Joyce) Amon of Morrice.
Interment will following in EastLawn Cemetery Memory Gardens, Okemos, Michigan. 
LETTS, Willie (I133270)
 
19 ***** State Journal ***** Tschirhart, Daniel L. East Lansing, Michigan age 60, passed away April 18, 2002, at his home. Mr Tschirhat was a well respected and committed attorney and was a former District Judge. He was a character, who will be dearly missed by his family and many friends.
He was preceded in death by his parents, Eleanor and Joseph , and brother Paul. He was a devoted father to his 2 daughters, Jennifer L. Tschirhart and Lori A. Tschirhart; 2 sisters, Mary Ann (Tony) Kubacki and Sally (Jim) Mowry; brother, Tom (Jancie) Tschirhart; and many nieces and nephews.
Interment will be at Saints Peter & Paul Catholic Cemetery in Ruth, Michigan 
TSCHIRHART, Daniel Lee (I133401)
 
20 ***** State Journal ***** July 5, 1977 Mrs. Julia M. Bently, age 76,died in a local Hospital July 4, 1977. She had been a lifelong residentof the greater Lansing area. Member of the Holt Assembly of God Church.
Surviving are 1 daughter, Mrs. Armo (Ethel) Keaton of Lansing 2grandchildren 6 great-grandchildren and 2 sister, Mrs. Vera Pinkley andMrs. Helen McDaniel both of Lansing. Burial will be in Rowley Cemeteryin Webbervill, Michigan ( often 52 going North ) 
ELLIOTT, Julia (I133187)
 
21 1 - In 1463 the lands of Kintail were held by Alexander Mackenzie, " when the Mackenzies obtained the first authentic charter on record as direct vassals from the Crown."
During the whole of the previous two hundred years - there is no trace of Colin Fitzgerald or any of his descendants as superiors of the lands of Kintail in terms of Alexander III.'s reputed charter of 1266, the Mackenzies holding all that time from and as direct vassals of their relatives, the Earls of Ross, who really held the position of Crown vassals which, according to the upholders of the Fitzgerald theory, had that theory been true, would have been held by Colin and his posterity. But neither he nor any of his reputed descendants appear once on record in that capacity during the whole of these two centuries. On the contrary, it has now been proved from unquestionable authentic sources that Kintail was in possession of the Earls of Ross in, and for at least two generations before, 1296; that King Robert the Bruce confirmed him in these lands in 1306, and again in 1329; that in 1342 Earl William granted the ten davochs or pennylands of Kintail - which is its whole extent - to Reginald of the Isles; that this grant was afterwards confirmed by David II.; and that between the years 1362 and 1372 the Earl of Ross exchanged the lands of Kintail, including the Castle of Ellandonnan, with his brother Hugh for lands in Buchan.
Although the Earls of Ross were superiors of the lands of Kintail, the Mackenzies occupied the lands and the castle, not as immediate vassals; of the King, but of their own near relatives, the O'Beolan Earls of Ross and their successors, for at least two hundred years before the Mackenzies received a grant of it for themselves direct from the Crown. This is proved beyond dispute by genuine historical
documents. Until within a few years of the final forfeiture of the Lords of the Isles in 1476, the Mackenzies undoubtedly held their lands, first from the O'Beolan Earls and subsequently from the Island Lords as Earls of Ross; for the first direct Crown
charter to any chief of Kintail of which we have authentic record, is one dated the 7th of January, 1463, in favour of Alexander "Ionraic," the sixth Baron.
[History Of The Mackenzies by Alexander Mackenzie, NEW, REVISED, AND EXTENDED EDITION pub 1894]
http://www.fullbooks.com/History-Of-The-Mackenzies1.html 
Mackenzie, Alexander 'upright' 7th of Kintail (I6414)
 
22 1 - In 1463 the lands of Kintail were held by Alexander Mackenzie, " when the Mackenzies obtained the first authentic charter on record as direct vassals from the Crown."
During the whole of the previous two hundred years - there is no trace of Colin Fitzgerald or any of his descendants as superiors of the lands of Kintail in terms of Alexander III.'s reputed charter of 1266, the Mackenzies holding all that time from and as direct vassals of their relatives, the Earls of Ross, who really held the position of Crown vassals which, according to the upholders of the Fitzgerald theory, had that theory been true, would have been held by Colin and his posterity. But neither he nor any of his reputed descendants appear once on record in that capacity during the whole of these two centuries. On the contrary, it has now been proved from unquestionable authentic sources that Kintail was in possession of the Earls of Ross in, and for at least two generations before, 1296; that King Robert the Bruce confirmed him in these lands in 1306, and again in 1329; that in 1342 Earl William granted the ten davochs or pennylands of Kintail - which is its whole extent - to Reginald of the Isles; that this grant was afterwards confirmed by David II.; and that between the years 1362 and 1372 the Earl of Ross exchanged the lands of Kintail, including the Castle of Ellandonnan, with his brother Hugh for lands in Buchan.
Although the Earls of Ross were superiors of the lands of Kintail, the Mackenzies occupied the lands and the castle, not as immediate vassals; of the King, but of their own near relatives, the O'Beolan Earls of Ross and their successors, for at least two hundred years before the Mackenzies received a grant of it for themselves direct from the Crown. This is proved beyond dispute by genuine historical
documents. Until within a few years of the final forfeiture of the Lords of the Isles in 1476, the Mackenzies undoubtedly held their lands, first from the O'Beolan Earls and subsequently from the Island Lords as Earls of Ross; for the first direct Crown
charter to any chief of Kintail of which we have authentic record, is one dated the 7th of January, 1463, in favour of Alexander "Ionraic," the sixth Baron.
[History Of The Mackenzies by Alexander Mackenzie, NEW, REVISED, AND EXTENDED EDITION pub 1894]
http://www.fullbooks.com/History-Of-The-Mackenzies1.html 
Mackenzie, Alexander 'upright' 7th of Kintail (I6414)
 
23 1 - "daughter Cameron of Locheil"

2 - Father identified as Cameron of Lochiel ; assumed to be of this generation. 
Cameron, dau. (I20338)
 
24 1 - (1614 - ) The son of Hugh Mackay, Donald, was raised to a baronetcy in the year 1627. He applied for and was granted a warrant to raise troop to fight for the Protestant cause in the Thirty Years' War, and led 3000 men, mostly Mackay clansmen. Fighting under the command of the King of Denmark in Holstein, they won for themselves the name "the Invincible Scots." In February, 1628, King Charles I became a peer, as Lord Reay. The title itself is a mark of the the superior manipulation of the Crown by Sutherland, in contrast to the simple loyalty of Mackay. As the Book of Mackay observes: "His proper and natural title was Lord Strathnaver, but the Sutherland family picked that up in 1588, when they secured the superiority of Strathnaver from the king."
After the Denmark phase of the war, Lord Reay's regiment became a favourite corps of King Gustavus II Adolphus of Sweden, during the fighting in Germany. Exemplary among the exploits of the Mackay clansmen was the defence of the Pass of Oldenburg. The Rev. Angus Mackay describes the action thus:
Their next great exploit was at the Pass of Oldenburg, which Sir Donald was instructed to hold at all hazard, in order to enable the Duke of Wiemar to embark his troops at Heiligenhafn. From daybreak to sunset of a late October day, Mackay held the pass with his men against an overwhelming host under Tilly. Torn and stung by shot and ball, they clung to the position with a heroic tenacity which defied the indomitable Tilly. As may be imagined their losses were very heavy. Sir Donald himself was severely wounded by the explosion of a barrel of gunpowder, but he grimly stuck to his post; while Sir Patrick McKie of Largs and other officers had to be carried off the field. When the regiment went into winter quarters shortly after this, of the 3600 men who had embarked at Cromarty, only a twelvemonth before, but 800 whole and about 150 maimed survived. In other words, in a four months' campaign they lost three-fourths of their number. Truly the glory of war is bought at a great price!
Donald, 1st Lord Reay, remained loyal to Charles I, opposing the Covenanters, and was a leader in the defence of Newcastle during the siege of 1644:
The defence of Newcastle was the most brilliant military exploit of the Royalists during the Civil war, for the dashing victories of Montrose were but rapid tumultuous Highland charges; and the credit of it may justly be claimed for Lord Reay, whose military experience on the Continent made him the most capable general within its walls.
Donald Mackay died in February, 1649, in Denmark, and his body was returned to Strathnaver to be buried.
(http://www.magma.ca/~mmackay/reay.html)

2 - Sir Donald Mackay was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia on 28 March 1627. A year later he was elevated to the peerage as Baron Reay. Lord Reay was a distinguished soldier who fought for Charles I in the civil war. He was to have been created Earl of Strahnvaer, but the royal patent was not completed. He went into exile in Denmark, where he died in February 1649.
(http://www.theisleofjura.co.uk/index%20files/Clans/MacKay.html)

3 - Donald Mackay, 1st Lord Reay (March 1591 ? February 1649), known as Sir Donald Mackay, 1st Baronet, from 1627 to 1628, was a Scottish peer and soldier.
Mackay was the eldest son of Huistean Du Mackay. He was created a Baronet, of Strathnaver, in 1627 and the following year he was raised to the Peerage of Scotland as Lord Reay, of Reay in the County of Caithness. In 1626 he raised a regiment under a charter from King Charles I, with which he served with distinction in Denmark under Christian IV. He was not present with the regiment when they fought at the Siege of Stralsund in 1628, command devolving to his lieutenant colonel, Alexander Seaton. then under Gustavus Adolphus in the Thirty Years' War. He later fought as a Royalist in the Civil War.

Lord Reay was married four times. He married, firstly, Barbara Mackenzie, sister of Colin Mackenzie, 1st Earl of Seaforth, in 1610. He married, secondly, Rachel Winterfield or Harrison, sometime before 1631. This marriage was annulled. He married, thirdly, Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Thomson, and fourthly, Marjorie, daughter of Francis Sinclair. Lord Reay died in February 1649, aged 57, and was succeeded in his titles by his son John.
[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Mackay,_1st_Lord_Reay] 
Mackay, Sir Donald of Strathnaver, 1st Baronet, 1st Lord Reay (I34472)
 
25 1 - (1614 - ) The son of Hugh Mackay, Donald, was raised to a baronetcy in the year 1627. He applied for and was granted a warrant to raise troop to fight for the Protestant cause in the Thirty Years' War, and led 3000 men, mostly Mackay clansmen. Fighting under the command of the King of Denmark in Holstein, they won for themselves the name "the Invincible Scots." In February, 1628, King Charles I became a peer, as Lord Reay. The title itself is a mark of the the superior manipulation of the Crown by Sutherland, in contrast to the simple loyalty of Mackay. As the Book of Mackay observes: "His proper and natural title was Lord Strathnaver, but the Sutherland family picked that up in 1588, when they secured the superiority of Strathnaver from the king."
After the Denmark phase of the war, Lord Reay's regiment became a favourite corps of King Gustavus II Adolphus of Sweden, during the fighting in Germany. Exemplary among the exploits of the Mackay clansmen was the defence of the Pass of Oldenburg. The Rev. Angus Mackay describes the action thus:
Their next great exploit was at the Pass of Oldenburg, which Sir Donald was instructed to hold at all hazard, in order to enable the Duke of Wiemar to embark his troops at Heiligenhafn. From daybreak to sunset of a late October day, Mackay held the pass with his men against an overwhelming host under Tilly. Torn and stung by shot and ball, they clung to the position with a heroic tenacity which defied the indomitable Tilly. As may be imagined their losses were very heavy. Sir Donald himself was severely wounded by the explosion of a barrel of gunpowder, but he grimly stuck to his post; while Sir Patrick McKie of Largs and other officers had to be carried off the field. When the regiment went into winter quarters shortly after this, of the 3600 men who had embarked at Cromarty, only a twelvemonth before, but 800 whole and about 150 maimed survived. In other words, in a four months' campaign they lost three-fourths of their number. Truly the glory of war is bought at a great price!
Donald, 1st Lord Reay, remained loyal to Charles I, opposing the Covenanters, and was a leader in the defence of Newcastle during the siege of 1644:
The defence of Newcastle was the most brilliant military exploit of the Royalists during the Civil war, for the dashing victories of Montrose were but rapid tumultuous Highland charges; and the credit of it may justly be claimed for Lord Reay, whose military experience on the Continent made him the most capable general within its walls.
Donald Mackay died in February, 1649, in Denmark, and his body was returned to Strathnaver to be buried.
(http://www.magma.ca/~mmackay/reay.html)

2 - Sir Donald Mackay was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia on 28 March 1627. A year later he was elevated to the peerage as Baron Reay. Lord Reay was a distinguished soldier who fought for Charles I in the civil war. He was to have been created Earl of Strahnvaer, but the royal patent was not completed. He went into exile in Denmark, where he died in February 1649.
(http://www.theisleofjura.co.uk/index%20files/Clans/MacKay.html)

3 - Donald Mackay, 1st Lord Reay (March 1591  
Mackay, Sir Donald of Strathnaver, 1st Baronet, 1st Lord Reay (I34472)
 
26 1 - 11th Earl of Lennox 1513-1526
John, twelfth Earl of Lennox and third Lord Darnley,P.C.,who was born circa 1496 and was killed after being captured at the battle of Manuel [Manuel, near Linlithgow Palace ]by Sir James Hamilton of Finnart on 4 September 1526. He was a Privy Councilor, Lord Warden of the East March, and as a Lord of Regency he was a guardian of King James V. The earl married (contract 19 January 1511) his cousin Lady Elizabeth Stewart, daughter of John, Earl of Atholl (she married, secondly before March 1529/30, the twelfth earl's brother-in-law, Ninian, third Lord Ross of Halkhead).

2 - John, Earl of Lennox, in the Darnley line, gave a grant of the lands of Inchinnan in Renfrewshire, "delecto consanguineo suo Gulielmo Stirling de Glorat et Margaretae Houstoun sposae suae," in 1525, which is the first trace to be found of the family; but very probably Glorat was acquired by the Stirlings about 1470, after the death of Isabella, Countess of Lennox eldest daughter of the 8th Earl.
[ http://www.clanstirling.org/Main/lib/research/OldCountyFamiliesofStirlin.html ]

3 - John became one of the guardians of James V. and was murdered in 1526.
[ http://38.1911encyclopedia.org/L/LE/LENNOX.htm ]

4 - In 1526 the Battle of Linlithgow Bridge was fought; it was one of those faction fights between two contending armies for predominance which were so prevalent in Scotland at the time, the real object, however, being to rescue King James V frm the domination of the Earl of Angus. The opposing fronts under Angus and Lennox extended on both sides of the Avon. The Earl of Lennox was slain by Sir James Hamilton after quarter had been granted to the former. His sword was afterwards found, and may still be seen in the small museum at Linlithgow.
- From John O'Groats to Land's End by Robert Naylor and John Naylor
[ http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14415/14415-h/14415-h.htm ] 
Stewart, John 12th (3rd Stuart) Earl of Lennox, 3rd Lord Darnley (I75)
 
27 1 - 11th Earl of Lennox 1513-1526
John, twelfth Earl of Lennox and third Lord Darnley,P.C.,who was born circa 1496 and was killed after being captured at the battle of Manuel [Manuel, near Linlithgow Palace ]by Sir James Hamilton of Finnart on 4 September 1526. He was a Privy Councilor, Lord Warden of the East March, and as a Lord of Regency he was a guardian of King James V. The earl married (contract 19 January 1511) his cousin Lady Elizabeth Stewart, daughter of John, Earl of Atholl (she married, secondly before March 1529/30, the twelfth earl's brother-in-law, Ninian, third Lord Ross of Halkhead).

2 - John, Earl of Lennox, in the Darnley line, gave a grant of the lands of Inchinnan in Renfrewshire, "delecto consanguineo suo Gulielmo Stirling de Glorat et Margaretae Houstoun sposae suae," in 1525, which is the first trace to be found of the family; but very probably Glorat was acquired by the Stirlings about 1470, after the death of Isabella, Countess of Lennox eldest daughter of the 8th Earl.
[ http://www.clanstirling.org/Main/lib/research/OldCountyFamiliesofStirlin.html ]

3 - John became one of the guardians of James V. and was murdered in 1526.
[ http://38.1911encyclopedia.org/L/LE/LENNOX.htm ]

4 - In 1526 the Battle of Linlithgow Bridge was fought; it was one of those faction fights between two contending armies for predominance which were so prevalent in Scotland at the time, the real object, however, being to rescue King James V frm the domination of the Earl of Angus. The opposing fronts under Angus and Lennox extended on both sides of the Avon. The Earl of Lennox was slain by Sir James Hamilton after quarter had been granted to the former. His sword was afterwards found, and may still be seen in the small museum at Linlithgow.
- From John O'Groats to Land's End by Robert Naylor and John Naylor
[ http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14415/14415-h/14415-h.htm ] 
Stewart, John 12th (3rd Stuart) Earl of Lennox, 3rd Lord Darnley (I75)
 
28 1 - 1505: The 3rd Lord Graham was made Earl of Montrose.

2 - The third Lord Graham took part in 1488 at the battle of Sauchieburn, in which James III. fell. In that battle the King 
Graham, William 3rd Lord, 1st Earl of Montrose (I2434)
 
29 1 - 1519 Lord William Sempill II obtains a charter to the lordship with the assistance of the Regent of Albany. He favours the betrothal of the infant Mary, queen of Scots, to the son of Henry VIII of England. William becomes one of the Privy Council for King James V.

2 - WILLIAM, SECOND LORD SEMPLE, the eldest son of the first lord, was one of the Privy Council of James the Fifth, and Lord Justiciary and heritable Bailie of the
Regality of Paisley. He was one of those who assented to the match betwixt Queen Mary and Prince Edward of England, August 25, 1543, and died in 1548. In 1547, he
purchased from John Bruntschells, the last of the family of Bruntschells of that ilk, the estate of Bruntschells (a corruption of Burnt shields), in the parish of Kilbarchan,
Renfrewshire. His lordship married, first, Lady Margaret Montgomery, eldest daughter of Hugh, first Earl of Eglintoun, by the Lady Helen Campbell, daughter of Archibald, Earl of Argyll, and by her had issue.
1. Robert, who succeeded as third Lord
2. David, ancestor of the Semples of Craigbetts, a branch of whom settled in Spain and flourished there.
3. Helen, married Allan, third Lord Cathcart.
4. Mart, married Sir John Stirling of Keir.
He married, secondly, Elizabeth, daughter of Arnot, of Arnot; thirdly, Marian, daughter of Hugh Montgomery of Hazelhead, without issue.
(GENEALOGICAL HISTORY OF THE FAMILY SEMPLE FROM 1214 TO 1888. Compiled William Alexander Semple, of Broad Brook, Conn., U. S. A. pub 1888)
[Sempill-Genealogical_History_of_the_Family_Semple pub.1888.pdf] 
Sempill, William 2nd Lord (I1285)
 
30 1 - 1578, June 13
A Band of Friendship-a sort of modification of the old bonds of manred-was formed by the Earl of Eglintoun, the Earl of Glencairn, Lord Boyd, the respective eldest sons of these nobles, Sir Matthew Campbell of Loudon, and Wallace of Craigie, for the repressing of diverse troubles in the country, and with a view to their greater efficiency in the king's service. They bound themselves, upon their faith and honours, 'the holy evangel touched, to tak true, faithful, plain, and aefald part all together, as wed by way of law as deed, pursuit as defence in all actions, causes, quarrels, controversies, and debates, movit or to be movit by or against us... against whatsomever person or persons, the king's majesty alane excepted.' It was also concluded 'that all castles, houses, strengths perteining to us sall be ready and patent to ilk ane of us, as the occasion may require.' Then came a remarkable clause-' Gif it sall happen, as God forbid, ony different, slaughter, bluid, or other inconvenient, to fail out amangs us, our friends, servants, or dependers, the same, of whatsomever wecht or quality it sall be of, sall be remitted to the decision and judgment of the remanent of us, wha sall have power to judge and decern thereintill, whase sentence and decreet baith the parties sall bide at, fulfil, and observe without reclamation, and sall be as valid and effectual in all respects, and have as full execution, as the same had been given and pronounced after cognition in the cause, by the Lords of Session, Justice-general of Scotland, or ony other judge ordinar within this realm.'

2 - Sir Mathew Campbell of Loudoun, Sheriff of Ayr, who had various Charters from 1565, till 1570. He promoted the reformation, but still was on the side of Queen Mary, and was taken prisoner by her opponents at the battle of Langside. He died about 1572. He married Isabel daughter of Sir John Drummond of Innerpeffry, and by her had issue, two sons and seven daughters:
1. Hugh;
2. Mathew, who went to Germany and signalized himself there in the wars; settled in Livonia, and
from the family designation assumed the name of Loudon, or Laudon, and was ancestor of the late celebrated Field Marshall Count Laudohn, in the Imperial Armies of Austria, the successful opponent of the Great Frederick :
the seven daughters married, respectively, to -
1. Montgomery of Giffin;
2. Lord Boyd;
3. Sir John Wallace of Craigie;
4. Cunningham of Caprington;
5. Crawford of Lochnorris;
6. Lord Kirkcudbright ; and
7. Ker of Kersland.
He was succeeded by his eldest son, Sir Hugh Campbell of Loudoun, Sheriff of Ayr who
was created Lord Loudoun in 1601.
(Topographical description of Ayrshire, more particularly of Cunninghame, together with a genealogical account of the principal families in that bailiwick by George Robertson, 1750?-1832
Publication date 1820)
[https://archive.org/stream/topographicaldes00robe/topographicaldes00robe_djvu.txt] 
Campbell, Sir Matthew of Loudoun, Sheriff of Ayr (I2341)
 
31 1 - 1580, Apr
John Innes, of that Ilk, being childless, entered, in March 1577, into a mutual bond of tailyie with his nearest relation, Alexander Tunes, of Cromy, conveying to him his whole estate, failing heirs-male of his body, and taking the like disposition from Cromy of his estate. There was a richer branch of the family represented by Robert Innes, of Innermarky, who pined to see the poorer preferred in this manner. So loud were his expressions of displeasure, that 'Cromy, who was the gallantest man of his name, found himself obliged to make the proffer of meeting him single in arms, and, laying the tailyie upon the grass, see if he durst take it up? in one word, to pass from all other pretensions, and let the best fellow have it.'
This silenced Innermarky, but did not extinguish his discontent. He began to work upon the feelings of the Laird of Innes, representing how Cromy already took all upon himself, even the name of Laird, leaving him no better than a masterless dog? as contemptible, indeed, as a beggar? a condition from which there could be no relief but by putting the usurper out of the way. This he himself offered to do with his own hand, if the laird would concur with him: it was an unpleasant business, but he would undertake it, rather than see his chief made a slave. By these practices, the weak bird was brought to give his consent to the slaughter of an innocent gentleman, his nearest relation, and whom he had not long before regarded with so much good-will as to admit him to a participation of his whole fortune.
'There wanted nothing but a conveniency for putting their purpose in execution, which did offer itself in the month of April 1580. At which time Alexander, being called upon some business to Aberdeen, was obliged to stay longer there than he intended, by reason that his only son Robert, a youth of sixteen years of age, had fallen sick at the college, and his father could not leave the place till he saw what became of him. He had transported him out of the Old Town, and had brought him to his own lodgings in the New Town. He had also sent several of his servants home from time to time, to let his lady know the reason of his stay.
'By means of these servants, it came to be known perfectly at Kinnairdy in what circumstances Alexander was at Aberdeen, where he was lodged, and how he was attended, which invited Tunermarky to take the occasion. Wherefore, getting a considerable number of assistants with him, he and Laird John ride to Aberdeen; they enter the town upon the night, and about midnight came to Alexander's lodging.
'The outer gate of the close they found open, but all the rest of the doors shut. They were afraid to break up the doors by violence, lest the noise might alarm the neighbourhood; but choiced rather to raise such a cry in the close as might oblige those who were within to open the doors and see what it might be.
'The feuds at that time betwixt the families of Gordon and Forbes were not extinguished; therefore they raised a cry as if it had been upon some outfall among these people, crying, "Help a Gordon? a Gordon!" which is the gathering-word of the friends of that family. Alexander, being deeply interested in the Gordons, at the noise of the cry started from his bed, took his sword in hand, and opening a back-door that led to the court below, stepped down three or four steps, and cried to know what was the matter. Innermarky, who by his word knew him, and by his white shirt discerned him perfectly, cocks his gun, and shoots him through the body. In an instant, as many as could get about him fell upon him, and butchered him barbarously.
'Innermarky, perceiving, in the meantime, that Laird John stood by, as either relenting or terrified, held the bloody dagger to his throat, that he had newly taken out of the murdered body, swearing dreadfully that he would serve him in the same way if he did not as he did, and so compelled him to draw his dagger, and stab it up to the hilt in the body of his nearest relation, and the bravest that bore his name. After his example, all that were there behoved to do the like, that all might be alike guilty. Yea, in prosecution of this, it has been told me, that Mr John Innes, afterwards of Coxton, being a youth then at school, was raised out of bed, and compelled by Innermarky to stab a dagger into the dead body, that the more might be under the same condemnation? a very crafty cruelty.
'The next thing looked after was the destruction of the sick youth Robert, who had lain that night in a bed by his father, but, upon the noise of what was done, had scrambled from it, and by the help of one John of Coloreasons, or rather of some of the people of the house, had got out at an unfrequented back-door into the garden, and from that into a neighbour's house, where he had shelter, the Lord in his providence preserving him for the executing of vengeance upon these murderers for the blood of his father.
'Then Innermarky took the dead man's signet-ring, and sent it to his wife, as from her husband, by a servant whom he had purchased to that purpose, ordering her to send him such a particular box, which contained the bond of tailyie and all that had followed thereupon betwixt him and Laird John, whom, the servant said, he had left with his master at Aberdeen, and that, for dispatch, he had sent his best horse with him, and had not taken leisure to write, but sent the ring.
'Though it troubled the woman much to receive so blind a message, yet her husband's ring, his own servant, and his horse, prevailed so with her, together with the man's importunity to be gone, that she delivered to him what he sought, and let him go.
'There happened to be then about the house a youth related to the family, who was curious to go the length of Aberdeen, and see the young laird who had been sick, and to whom he was much addicted. This youth had gone to the stable, to intercede with the servant that he might carry him behind him; and in his discourse had found the man under great restraint and confusion of mind, sometimes saying he was to go no further than Kinnairdy (which indeed was the truth), and at other times that he behoved to be immediately at Aberdeen. This brought him to jalouse [suspect], though he knew not what; but further knowledge he behoved to have, and therefore he stepped out a little beyond the entry, watching the servant's coming, and in the by-going suddenly leaped on behind him, or have a satisfying reason why he refused him. The contest became such betwixt them, that the servant drew his dirk to rid him of the youth's trouble, which the other wrung out of his bands, and downright killed him with it, and brought back the box, with the writs and horse, to the house of Innes (or Cromy, I know not which).
'As the lady is in a confusion for what had fallen out, there comes another of the servants from Aberdeen, who gave an account of the slaughter, so that she behoved to conclude a special hand of Providence to have been in the first passage. Her next course was to secure her husband's writs the best she could, and fly to her friends for shelter, by whose means she was brought with all speed to the king, before whom she made her complaint.'
The son of the murdered man was taken under the care of the Earl of Huntly, who was his relation; but so little apprehension was there of a prosecution for the murder, that Innermarky, five weeks after the event, obtained from his chief a disposition of the estate in his own favour. Two or three years after, however, the young Laird of Cromy came north with a commission for the avenging of his father's murder, and the Laird of Innes and Innermarky were both obliged to go into hiding. For a time, the latter skulked in the hills, but, wearying of that, he got a retreat constructed for himself in the house of Edinglassie, where he afterwards found shelter. Here young Cromy surprised him in September 1584. The same young man who had killed his servant was the first to enter his Patmos, for which venturesome act he was all his life after called Craig-in-peril. Innermarky's head was cut off, and, it is said, afterwards taken by Cromy's widow to Edinburgh, and cast at the king's feet. The Innermarky branch being thus set aside, young Cromy succeeded in due time as Laird of Innes.? Hist. Acc. Fam. Innes.

2 - Robert Innes was born before 1588. He was the son of Alexander Innes (of Crombie) and Beatrix Dunbar.
[http://www.linleyfh.com/oursecondsite-p/p469.htm#i5477] 
Innes, Robert 19th of that ilk (I29789)
 
32 1 - 1593 - Amongst the complications of the affair between Huntly and Moray in February 1592, there were mingled the details of a plot in which Huntly and the Chancellor Maitland were connected with three chieftains of the clan Campbell Campbell, Archibald 2nd of Lochnell (I119451)
 
33 1 - 1593 - Amongst the complications of the affair between Huntly and Moray in February 1592, there were mingled the details of a plot in which Huntly and the Chancellor Maitland were connected with three chieftains of the clan Campbell? Ardkinlas, Lochnell, and Glenurchy? against the life of John Campbell of Calder, who was obnoxious to the latter persons on account of his supreme influence in the affairs of the minor Earl of Argyle. By the exertions of Ardkinlas, a man called MacEllar was procured to undertake the assassination of Calder: and in the same month which saw the tragedy at Dunnibrissle, this wretched man shot Calder with three bullets, through a window, as the victim sat unsuspecting of danger in the house of Knepoch in Lorn.
The youthful earl having threatened vengeance against Ardkinlas, the latter seems to have lost heart; and being extremely desirous of recovering his young chief's regard, he subsequently tried to accomplish his purpose by revealing what he knew of another plot in which the same parties were concerned against the earl's life. It may be sufficient to remark that MacEllar and a higher agent in the a person of John Oig Campbell of Cabrachan, a brother of Lochnell, were taken and executed for Calder's death; but owing to various causes, among which the complicity and friendship of Maitland was probably the chief, Ardkinlas continued for a considerable time to keep out of the grasp of the law.
It was not till September 1596 that Ardkinlas underwent a trial for the slaughter of the Laird of Calder. The matter having doubtless been arranged beforehand, no pursuers appeared, and he was set at liberty.

2 - II. Archibald is said to have had four wives, at or about the same time. 1st. Janet, daughter to Duncan na-mein Macdougall of Dunollie, chief of the Macdougalls; by her he had
1st. Alexander, his heir, and
2nd. Cailen-na-kille of Kilekolmkill, in Benderloch, who was married to a daughter of Stirling of Keir, relict of Buchanan of Leni, extinct.
The second was a daughter of MacLean of Duart.
Jessie, the third, was daughter to Chuin O'Donell, Ireland. She was mother to Ian Connelach, married to Loup's daughter; of them are the Campbells of Corrieleigh.
The fourth was Isabella, daughter to Drummond of Cochyle, and relict of William Redoch
of Aberledmont; by her he had James of Croguan, married to a daughter of the Bishop of Ardchattan, second son to Campbell the first Laird of Calder; of him are the families of Stonefield and Balerno.
Isabella was the only one of Archibald's wives who survived him. She afterwards married the chief of the Macdougalls, Laird of Dunollie.
By his different wives he had several daughters. Margaret, married to M'Lean of Lochbuy; Ann to Campbell of Dunstaffnage; Janet to Campbell of Barbrec, and the fourth to Stewart of Appin.
Archibald, with his two brothers, Donald and Colin, were killed at Glenlivet, and interred in the tomb of Farquharson, Uschriachan, Aberdeenshire, 1594.
(Campbell-The House of Argyll and the collateral branches of the clan.pdf) 
Campbell, Archibald 2nd of Lochnell (I119451)
 
34 1 - 1597 A deputation of ministers went this summer through the provinces of Aberdeen, Moray, and Ross, to complete as far as possible the planting of them with ministers. The chief of the Clan Mackintosh surprised the deputation by the zeal and cordiality he shewed towards the object. He met them at Inverness, exhibited a plan for settling ministers in his country, and subscribed it in their presence. ?Now,? said he, ?it may be thought I am liberal because nae minister will venture to come amang us. Get me men and sey [try] me. I will find sufficient caution in St Johnston, Dundee, or Aberdeen, for safety of their persons, obedience to their doctrine and discipline, and guid payment of their stipend.??Ja. Mel. We have seen enough of the leading men of this age in Scotland not to be too much surprised on learning that this was the same Highland chief who had sent out his clan on a wild ravaging expedition in 1592, when the hospitable old baron of Brackla was one of their victims, and who is summed up in the Historie of King James the Sext, as ?a man unconstant, false, and double-minded, by the report of all men.?

2 - Lachlan Mackintosh,
being only an infant when his father, William Mackintosh of that
ilk, was murdered in 1550, was carried for safety by some of his
humble retainers to the county of Ross. This came to the knowledge
of Colin, younger of Kintail, who took possession of the young
heir of Mackintosh, and carried him to Ellandonnan Castle. The
old chief retained him, and treated him with great care until
the years of pupilarity had expired, and then married him to his
daughter Agnes, by no means an unsuitable match for either, apart
from the time and manner in which it was consummated
[ http://www.fullbooks.com/History-Of-The-Mackenzies5.html ] 
Macintosh, Lachlan Mor 16th of Mackintosh, 17th of Clan Chattan (I3570)
 
35 1 - 1597 A deputation of ministers went this summer through the provinces of Aberdeen, Moray, and Ross, to complete as far as possible the planting of them with ministers. The chief of the Clan Mackintosh surprised the deputation by the zeal and cordiality he shewed towards the object. He met them at Inverness, exhibited a plan for settling ministers in his country, and subscribed it in their presence.  Macintosh, Lachlan Mor 16th of Mackintosh, 17th of Clan Chattan (I3570)
 
36 1 - 1629-1719, chief of the Scottish highland clan of Cameron after 1647. On behalf of Charles II he led his clan in an uprising against the Commonwealth in 1653, and only in 1658 did he submit to the Puritan general George Monck . He accompanied Monck to London in 1660 and was received at the court of the restored Charles II. He was knighted in 1681. A supporter of James II, he took part in the Jacobite victory over the forces of William III at Killiecrankie in 1689 and sent his clan to aid the Jacobite rebellion of 1715. Lochiel was a romantic warrior of great strength.
2 - He was known as the Great Lochiel. He fought with Montrose and later with Claverhouse. He was a striking man about whom a comtemporary wrote "His very look so fierce might fright the boldest foe".
3 - Old grudges amongst neighbouring clans still occasionally worked themselves out in regular military invasions accompanied by extensive depredations. There was an old feud between the Clan Cameron in Lochaber, and Struan Robertson in the upper part of Perthshire; and on the 14th of August 1666, the renowned chief, Ewen or Evan Cameron, came with above eighty followers, including several good duniwassals, (men near akin to the chief), to Struan?s lands of Kinloch? quartered there for a night upon the tenants, beat and threatened them, broke into and searched houses, all for the purpose of laying hold of their enemy, who, however, was out of the way. Disappointed of their primary object, the Camerons took twenty-six head of cattle, and made off with them to their own country. The misdeed being fully proven in November against Ewen Cameron Locheil, Sorlie Cameron, John Oig Cameron, and John and Duncan M?Ewen Camerons, the lords of the Privy Council ordained the first (who did not appear) to pay Struan a fine of a thousand merks, and the others, who had been confined for some time in the Tolbooth of Edinburgh, to restore to Struan the twenty-six stolen cattle. 
Cameron, Sir Ewen 5th of Locheil, 17th Chief (I5328)
 
37 1 - 1629-1719, chief of the Scottish highland clan of Cameron after 1647. On behalf of Charles II he led his clan in an uprising against the Commonwealth in 1653, and only in 1658 did he submit to the Puritan general George Monck . He accompanied Monck to London in 1660 and was received at the court of the restored Charles II. He was knighted in 1681. A supporter of James II, he took part in the Jacobite victory over the forces of William III at Killiecrankie in 1689 and sent his clan to aid the Jacobite rebellion of 1715. Lochiel was a romantic warrior of great strength.
2 - He was known as the Great Lochiel. He fought with Montrose and later with Claverhouse. He was a striking man about whom a comtemporary wrote "His very look so fierce might fright the boldest foe".
3 - Old grudges amongst neighbouring clans still occasionally worked themselves out in regular military invasions accompanied by extensive depredations. There was an old feud between the Clan Cameron in Lochaber, and Struan Robertson in the upper part of Perthshire; and on the 14th of August 1666, the renowned chief, Ewen or Evan Cameron, came with above eighty followers, including several good duniwassals, (men near akin to the chief), to Struan 
Cameron, Sir Ewen 5th of Locheil, 17th Chief (I5328)
 
38 1 - 1st Earl of Strathearn-Menteith Created 1st Graham Earl of Menteith 1427
The later earldom, which was created by James the First in the fifteenth century in favour of Malise Graham, formerly Earl of Strathern, did not include all the lands of the original earldom which had been forfeited by Murdach Duke of Albany as Earl of Menteith; on the contrary, the charter of creation of the new territorial earldom of Menteith reserved to the king the other portions of it.
Among the places thus reserved was the Castle of Doune, which was the principal messuage of the ancient earldom at the time of the forfeiture.
Malise inherited the title of Earl of Strathearn/Strathern from his mother but King James I conferred that title upon his uncle Walter and replaced Mailse's earldom with that of Menteith (often spelled "Monteith"). Malise's first wife is named as Ann Vere by Burkes Extinct Peerages 1883 (Graham of Strathern , etc) but as Jane de Rochford by The Scots Peerage (Menteith). Burkes Extinct 1883 identifies Alexander, John and Walter as being by Ann Vere. We show that Euphame was by her as well but that is an assumption. We show the second John and Walter as by his second wife following an indication to that effect by The Scots Peerage.

2 - Malise Graham, had the earldom of Stratherne removed from him by King James I and given to his uncle, Robert Graham, on the grounds that his mother should not have inherited a title whose descent was strictly through the male line, but received the earldom of Menteith instead.
Malise, also known as Earl of Strathearn. It was he whom King James I. deprived of the earldom, on the plea that it was a male fief, and made Earl of Menteith instead; and it was this action which moved the Earl's uncle, Sir Robert Graham, to renounce his allegiance, and to plot and carry out the assassination of the King at Perth. It should be remembered, however, that in this plot Earl Malise himself seems to have had no share. He lived till 1492, and left three sons, from the eldest of whom descended the Earls of Menteith and Airth,
[http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/dtog/graham2.html] 
Graham, Malise Earl of Strathearn, later 1st Earl of Menteith (I1311)
 
39 1 - 1st Earl of Strathearn-Menteith Created 1st Graham Earl of Menteith 1427
The later earldom, which was created by James the First in the fifteenth century in favour of Malise Graham, formerly Earl of Strathern, did not include all the lands of the original earldom which had been forfeited by Murdach Duke of Albany as Earl of Menteith; on the contrary, the charter of creation of the new territorial earldom of Menteith reserved to the king the other portions of it.
Among the places thus reserved was the Castle of Doune, which was the principal messuage of the ancient earldom at the time of the forfeiture.
Malise inherited the title of Earl of Strathearn/Strathern from his mother but King James I conferred that title upon his uncle Walter and replaced Mailse's earldom with that of Menteith (often spelled "Monteith"). Malise's first wife is named as Ann Vere by Burkes Extinct Peerages 1883 (Graham of Strathern , etc) but as Jane de Rochford by The Scots Peerage (Menteith). Burkes Extinct 1883 identifies Alexander, John and Walter as being by Ann Vere. We show that Euphame was by her as well but that is an assumption. We show the second John and Walter as by his second wife following an indication to that effect by The Scots Peerage.

2 - Malise Graham, had the earldom of Stratherne removed from him by King James I and given to his uncle, Robert Graham, on the grounds that his mother should not have inherited a title whose descent was strictly through the male line, but received the earldom of Menteith instead.
Malise, also known as Earl of Strathearn. It was he whom King James I. deprived of the earldom, on the plea that it was a male fief, and made Earl of Menteith instead; and it was this action which moved the Earl's uncle, Sir Robert Graham, to renounce his allegiance, and to plot and carry out the assassination of the King at Perth. It should be remembered, however, that in this plot Earl Malise himself seems to have had no share. He lived till 1492, and left three sons, from the eldest of whom descended the Earls of Menteith and Airth,
[http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/dtog/graham2.html] 
Graham, Malise Earl of Strathearn, later 1st Earl of Menteith (I1311)
 
40 1 - 2nd daughter Janet Douglas, married to John, 8th Lord Glammis, ancestor of the earl of Strathmore and Kinghorn, duke of Hamilton, earl of Cassilis, earl of Morton, Lord Spynie, &c.
("Genealogical memoir of the most noble and ancient house of Drummond" by David Malcolm pub. 1808)

2 - Falsly accused witch. She was the grand-daughter of Archibald Douglas the 5th Earl of Angus, a relationship which caused her terrible demise at the hands of King James V.
In his purge of the Douglases, Janet was accused of being a witch, arrested with her new second husband (Archibald Campbell of Skipnish) and imprisoned in a dark dungeon in Edinburgh Castle. He was killed while trying to escape, while she was burned at the stake on Castlehill in Edinburgh.

3 - Janet Douglas, Lady Glamis (c.1498 '96 17 July 1537) was a Scottish noblewoman accused of witchcraft, who was burned to death during the reign of James V of Scotland.

The Douglas family was far from favoured by King James V of Scotland; Janet's brother, Archibald Douglas, 6th Earl of Angus, was the King's stepfather, and Angus had imprisoned the young James. James's hatred for Angus extended to his whole family, including Janet. After James had broken free of the Douglas family, in December 1528 Janet was summoned for treason. She was accused with others for bringing supporters of the Earl of Angus to Edinburgh in June. However, James called her "our lovittis Dame Jonat Douglas" in a licence of 1529 allowing her and a co-accused Patrick Charteris of Cuthilgurdy to go on pilgrimage and be exempt from legal proceedings.

A recent historian, Jamie Cameron, thinks it unlikely that Janet went on pilgrimage, as she was the subject of a number of legal actions culminating in a charge of poisoning her husband John Lyon, 6th Lord Glamis who had died on 17 September 1528. This case was dropped and Janet was free to marry her second husband, Archibald Campbell of Skipness by the summer of 1532. However, on 17 July 1537 Janet was convicted of planning to poison the King and communicating with her brothers, the Earl of Angus and George Douglas.

James had Janet accused of witchcraft against him, although it was clear that the accusations were false. She was imprisoned with her husband (who escaped but was later killed) in a dungeon of Edinburgh Castle. It was easy for James to imprison Janet, but actually convicting her was more difficult. To gain "evidence", James had Janet's family members and servants subjected to torture. Janet was convicted and burned at the stake on 17 July 1537 on the esplanade of Edinburgh Castle, which her young son was forced to watch.

She was the daughter of George Douglas, Master of Angus and Elizabeth Drummond, daughter of John Drummond, 1st Lord Drummond. She married firstly to John Lyon, 6th Lord Glamis (1492'961528) and by him had issue:
John Lyon, 7th Lord Glamis
George Lyon
Margaret Lyon
Elizabeth Lyon, married 1st: John Forbes, Master of Forbes; married 2nd: Thomas Craig of Balnely; married 3rd: John Tulloch of Montcoffer; married 4th: John Abernethy.
Janet, Lady Glamis married secondly Archibald Campbell of Skipnish, second son of Archibald Campbell, 2nd Earl of Argyll.
[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janet_Douglas,_Lady_Glamis] 
Douglas, Janet the grey lady ghost of Glamis Castle (I2210)
 
41 1 - 2nd daughter Janet Douglas, married to John, 8th Lord Glammis, ancestor of the earl of Strathmore and Kinghorn, duke of Hamilton, earl of Cassilis, earl of Morton, Lord Spynie, &c.
("Genealogical memoir of the most noble and ancient house of Drummond" by David Malcolm pub. 1808)

2 - Falsly accused witch. She was the grand-daughter of Archibald Douglas the 5th Earl of Angus, a relationship which caused her terrible demise at the hands of King James V.
In his purge of the Douglases, Janet was accused of being a witch, arrested with her new second husband (Archibald Campbell of Skipnish) and imprisoned in a dark dungeon in Edinburgh Castle. He was killed while trying to escape, while she was burned at the stake on Castlehill in Edinburgh.

3 - Janet Douglas, Lady Glamis (c.1498 '96 17 July 1537) was a Scottish noblewoman accused of witchcraft, who was burned to death during the reign of James V of Scotland.

The Douglas family was far from favoured by King James V of Scotland; Janet's brother, Archibald Douglas, 6th Earl of Angus, was the King's stepfather, and Angus had imprisoned the young James. James's hatred for Angus extended to his whole family, including Janet. After James had broken free of the Douglas family, in December 1528 Janet was summoned for treason. She was accused with others for bringing supporters of the Earl of Angus to Edinburgh in June. However, James called her "our lovittis Dame Jonat Douglas" in a licence of 1529 allowing her and a co-accused Patrick Charteris of Cuthilgurdy to go on pilgrimage and be exempt from legal proceedings.

A recent historian, Jamie Cameron, thinks it unlikely that Janet went on pilgrimage, as she was the subject of a number of legal actions culminating in a charge of poisoning her husband John Lyon, 6th Lord Glamis who had died on 17 September 1528. This case was dropped and Janet was free to marry her second husband, Archibald Campbell of Skipness by the summer of 1532. However, on 17 July 1537 Janet was convicted of planning to poison the King and communicating with her brothers, the Earl of Angus and George Douglas.

James had Janet accused of witchcraft against him, although it was clear that the accusations were false. She was imprisoned with her husband (who escaped but was later killed) in a dungeon of Edinburgh Castle. It was easy for James to imprison Janet, but actually convicting her was more difficult. To gain "evidence", James had Janet's family members and servants subjected to torture. Janet was convicted and burned at the stake on 17 July 1537 on the esplanade of Edinburgh Castle, which her young son was forced to watch.

She was the daughter of George Douglas, Master of Angus and Elizabeth Drummond, daughter of John Drummond, 1st Lord Drummond. She married firstly to John Lyon, 6th Lord Glamis (1492'961528) and by him had issue:
John Lyon, 7th Lord Glamis
George Lyon
Margaret Lyon
Elizabeth Lyon, married 1st: John Forbes, Master of Forbes; married 2nd: Thomas Craig of Balnely; married 3rd: John Tulloch of Montcoffer; married 4th: John Abernethy.
Janet, Lady Glamis married secondly Archibald Campbell of Skipnish, second son of Archibald Campbell, 2nd Earl of Argyll.
[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janet_Douglas,_Lady_Glamis] 
Douglas, Janet the grey lady ghost of Glamis Castle (I2210)
 
42 1 - 2nd Lord Campbell, succeeded his grandfather 1453 while still in his minority, and was created Earl of Argyll in 1457.
John Macdonald Lord of the Isles and Earl of Ross was tried for treason after an armed uprising against King James III. He was tried by his peers-Argyll, Atholl, Huntly, and Crawford-in 1476 he forfeited his earldom of Ross and his lands in Inverness, Knapdalc, Kintyre, and Nairn.

2 - son of Archibald Roy, 2nd son of Sir Duncan, created Earl of Argyll in 1457, married to Isabel heiress to John Stewart, 3rd Lord of Lorne and thus added part of the lordship of Campbell in the parish of Dollar to his titles. He did not, as is generally stated, acquire by this marriage any part of the lordship of Lorn (which passed to Walter, brother of John, the fourth Lord Innermeath, and heir of entail), but obtained that lordship by exchanging the lands of Baldunning and Innerdunning, etc. in Perthshire, with the said Walter. In 1457 he was by James III. created Earl of Argyll and appointed Royal Lieutenant. In 1470 he was created baron of Lorn, and in 1481 he received a grant of much of Knapdale including the Keepership of Castle Sween or Sweyn, which had previously been held by the Lord of the Isles . Though Chancellor of Scotland, Royal Lieutenant for the West and Master of the King's Household, he readily joined Douglas, Earl of Angus, the Homes and the Hepburns in the plot that led to the slaying of King James III at Sauchieburn, near Stirling, 1488. In 1484 he kidnapped the child heir of the Lordship of the Isles, Donald Dubh after the Battle of Bloody Bay off Mull. He died in 1493. His younger son, Thomas, was the ancestor of the Campbells of Lundie, in Forfarshire. Another daughter was married to Torquil Macleod of the Lewis.
(http://members.fortunecity.com/gaulois/campbell.html)

3 - When, in 1489, Colin Campbell, first Earl of Argyll and Chancellor of Scotland, took possession of the castle that stands above Dollar, which in those days was spelt Dolour, meaning grief, near the Burn of Sorrow and Windy Pass, he decidd that its name must be changed. It was called The Gloume. It was had enough to live near the Burn of Sorrow, but to send out dinner invitations to Castle Gloom just wasn't on. What was the origin of all these lugubrious place-names is unknown. Perhaps the deed that inspired them was so awful that no one would mention it for centuries. In order to change the name to Castle Campbell,?b? ?/b?an Act of Parliament was necessary. The historian, Nigel Tranter, in his book, ?i?The's Scotland, ?/i?has unearthed a charming passage from the act:
Our Soveran lord of his Riale authoritie at the desire and supplicacion of his coising and traist Councalour Coline, Erie of Ergile, Lord Campbele and Lorne his chancellour has chengit the name of the castell and place quhilk wes calk the Gloue partenying to his said coising..:
[ "Reflections on Scotland" by Ian Wallace pub.1988 ]

4 - Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll, 2nd Lord Campbell (c. 1433 - May 10 , 1493 ) was a Scottish nobleman .
He was the son of Archibald Campbell, Master of Campbell and Elizabeth Somerville (daughter of John Somerville, 2nd Lord Somerville and Helen Hepburn).
He succeeded his grandfather Duncan Campbell, 1st Lord Campbell in 1453, and was created Earl of Argyll in 1457 and Lord Lorne in 1470, after the resignation of his wife's uncle Walter Stewart, 3rd Lord Lorne , who became Lord Innermeath .
Campbell had supported King James II against the " Black Douglases ", led by the 8th Earl of Douglas , and was given the earldom by King James III . James also gave him the position of Lord Chancellor of Scotland , but he eventually collaborated in the slaying of James III in 1484. In 1488 he became Lord Chancellor again, this time given by James IV of Scotland .
He married Isabelle Stewart, daughter of John Stewart, 2nd Lord Lorne in 1465. His oldest son was Archibald Campbell, 2nd Earl of Argyll , his middle son was Thomas Campbell, and his youngest son was Sir Colin Campbell of Glen Orchy (who was the ancestor of the Earls of Breadalbane ).
[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colin_Campbell,_1st_Earl_of_Argyll ] 
Campbell, Colin of Lochawe, 2nd Lord Lorne, 1st Earl of Argyll (I1329)
 
43 1 - 2nd Lord Campbell, succeeded his grandfather 1453 while still in his minority, and was created Earl of Argyll in 1457.
John Macdonald Lord of the Isles and Earl of Ross was tried for treason after an armed uprising against King James III. He was tried by his peers-Argyll, Atholl, Huntly, and Crawford-in 1476 he forfeited his earldom of Ross and his lands in Inverness, Knapdalc, Kintyre, and Nairn.

2 - son of Archibald Roy, 2nd son of Sir Duncan, created Earl of Argyll in 1457, married to Isabel heiress to John Stewart, 3rd Lord of Lorne and thus added part of the lordship of Campbell in the parish of Dollar to his titles. He did not, as is generally stated, acquire by this marriage any part of the lordship of Lorn (which passed to Walter, brother of John, the fourth Lord Innermeath, and heir of entail), but obtained that lordship by exchanging the lands of Baldunning and Innerdunning, etc. in Perthshire, with the said Walter. In 1457 he was by James III. created Earl of Argyll and appointed Royal Lieutenant. In 1470 he was created baron of Lorn, and in 1481 he received a grant of much of Knapdale including the Keepership of Castle Sween or Sweyn, which had previously been held by the Lord of the Isles . Though Chancellor of Scotland, Royal Lieutenant for the West and Master of the King's Household, he readily joined Douglas, Earl of Angus, the Homes and the Hepburns in the plot that led to the slaying of King James III at Sauchieburn, near Stirling, 1488. In 1484 he kidnapped the child heir of the Lordship of the Isles, Donald Dubh after the Battle of Bloody Bay off Mull. He died in 1493. His younger son, Thomas, was the ancestor of the Campbells of Lundie, in Forfarshire. Another daughter was married to Torquil Macleod of the Lewis.
(http://members.fortunecity.com/gaulois/campbell.html)

3 - When, in 1489, Colin Campbell, first Earl of Argyll and Chancellor of Scotland, took possession of the castle that stands above Dollar, which in those days was spelt Dolour, meaning grief, near the Burn of Sorrow and Windy Pass, he decidd that its name must be changed. It was called The Gloume. It was had enough to live near the Burn of Sorrow, but to send out dinner invitations to Castle Gloom just wasn't on. What was the origin of all these lugubrious place-names is unknown. Perhaps the deed that inspired them was so awful that no one would mention it for centuries. In order to change the name to Castle Campbell, 
Campbell, Colin of Lochawe, 2nd Lord Lorne, 1st Earl of Argyll (I1329)
 
44 1 - 3rd Earl, son of Archibald. He was married to Lady Jane Gordon, eldest daughter of Alexander, third Earl of Huntly, they had three sons and a daughter. Their sons were, Archibald, fourth Earl of Argyll; John, ancestor of the Campbells of Lochnell, of which house the Campbells of Balerno, and Stonefield are cadets; and Alexander, dean of Moray. Colin was, immediately after his accession to the earldom, appointed by the council to assemble an army and proceed against Lauchlan Maclean of Dowart, and other Highland chieftains, who had broken out into insurrection, and proclaimed Sir Donald of Lochalsh Lord of the Isles . Owing to the powerful influence of Argyll, the insurgents submitted to the regent, after strong measures had been adopted against them. In 1517 Sir Donald of Lochalsh again appeared in arms, but being deserted by his principle leaders, he effected his escape. Soon after, on his petition also in 1517 Colin was appointed Royal Lieutenant over all the Isles and adjacent mainland by Regent Albany. For some years the Isles remained peaceful and Colin employed this interval in extending his influence among the chiefs and in promoting the sway and importance of his clan, being assisted thereto by his brothers, Sir John Calder of Calder, so designed after his marriage with the heiress, and Archibald Campbell of Skipnish. On the escape of king James V, then in his seventeenth year, from the power of the Douglass, in May 1528, Colin was one of the first to join his majesty at Stirling. He afterwards received an ample confirmation of the hereditary sheriffship of Argleshire and of the offices of justiciary of Scotland and master of the household, by which these offices became hereditary in his family. He had the commission of justice-general of Scotland renewed 25th October 1529.
(http://members.fortunecity.com/gaulois/campbell.html)

2 - Colin Campbell, 3rd Earl of Argyll (c. 1486 - 9 October 1529 ) was a Scottish nobleman and soldier . He was the son of Archibald Campbell, 2nd Earl of Argyll and Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of John Stewart, 1st Earl of Lennx . In 1506/07 he married Lady Jean Gordon, the eldest daughter of Alexander Gordon, 3rd Earl of Huntly . Campbell led an army against the insurrection of various Highland chieftains; a few years later, he joined the court of King James V . He was given the position Lord Warden of the Marches and in 1528, Lord Justice General of Scotland. His daughter, Lady Elizabeth, was married to James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray , an illegitimate son of King James IV .
[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colin_Campbell,_3rd_Earl_of_Argyll ] 
Campbell, Colin of Carrick, 3rd Earl of Argyll (I759)
 
45 1 - 3rd Earl, son of Archibald. He was married to Lady Jane Gordon, eldest daughter of Alexander, third Earl of Huntly, they had three sons and a daughter. Their sons were, Archibald, fourth Earl of Argyll; John, ancestor of the Campbells of Lochnell, of which house the Campbells of Balerno, and Stonefield are cadets; and Alexander, dean of Moray. Colin was, immediately after his accession to the earldom, appointed by the council to assemble an army and proceed against Lauchlan Maclean of Dowart, and other Highland chieftains, who had broken out into insurrection, and proclaimed Sir Donald of Lochalsh Lord of the Isles . Owing to the powerful influence of Argyll, the insurgents submitted to the regent, after strong measures had been adopted against them. In 1517 Sir Donald of Lochalsh again appeared in arms, but being deserted by his principle leaders, he effected his escape. Soon after, on his petition also in 1517 Colin was appointed Royal Lieutenant over all the Isles and adjacent mainland by Regent Albany. For some years the Isles remained peaceful and Colin employed this interval in extending his influence among the chiefs and in promoting the sway and importance of his clan, being assisted thereto by his brothers, Sir John Calder of Calder, so designed after his marriage with the heiress, and Archibald Campbell of Skipnish. On the escape of king James V, then in his seventeenth year, from the power of the Douglass, in May 1528, Colin was one of the first to join his majesty at Stirling. He afterwards received an ample confirmation of the hereditary sheriffship of Argleshire and of the offices of justiciary of Scotland and master of the household, by which these offices became hereditary in his family. He had the commission of justice-general of Scotland renewed 25th October 1529.
(http://members.fortunecity.com/gaulois/campbell.html)

2 - Colin Campbell, 3rd Earl of Argyll (c. 1486 - 9 October 1529 ) was a Scottish nobleman and soldier . He was the son of Archibald Campbell, 2nd Earl of Argyll and Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of John Stewart, 1st Earl of Lennx . In 1506/07 he married Lady Jean Gordon, the eldest daughter of Alexander Gordon, 3rd Earl of Huntly . Campbell led an army against the insurrection of various Highland chieftains; a few years later, he joined the court of King James V . He was given the position Lord Warden of the Marches and in 1528, Lord Justice General of Scotland. His daughter, Lady Elizabeth, was married to James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray , an illegitimate son of King James IV .
[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colin_Campbell,_3rd_Earl_of_Argyll ] 
Campbell, Colin of Carrick, 3rd Earl of Argyll (I759)
 
46 1 - 3rd of Airth m. Janet daughter of Alexander 5th of Livingstone. Janet Livingstone, had a genealogy no less eminnent, being a great-granddaughter of James 1 and of Jane Beaufort his Queen. A sister of this Janet Livingstone was Mary Livingstone, one of the "four Marys" who were maids of honour to Mary, Queen of Scots. Sempill, of Beltrees, married Mary Livingstone, and their son, a cousin of Robert Bruce, the minister, used his influence with the king more than once in after days on behalf of his persecuted relative. Sir Alexander, the father of Master Robert Bruce, was a rude, bluff baron, with a goodly proportion of acres for his estate, and behind him a powerful following of retainers. On one occasion, supported by his trusty followers, he encountered a party of the retainers of the laird of Weems in the High Street of Edinburgh, whom he attacked and pistolled, the skirmish being a very bloody one. Alexander died in 1600.

2 - Airth Castle, the earliest part is a square tower, known as Wallace's Tower, built some time after 1488. An earlier building on the site was sacked by William Wallace when 100 Englishmen held his uncle, the Priest of Dunipace, within it.
The tower has two main floors and an attic within a parapet. The tower was extended to the east in the early 16th century and a further wing was added in 1581 by Sir Alexander Bruce. A wing was also added to the west end, but this had been demolished by 1762.

3 - Nov 24 1567
'. . . At 2 afternoon, the Laird of Airth and the Laird of Wemyss met upon the Hie Gait of Edinburgh; and they and their followers faught a very bluidy skirmish, where there was many hurt on both sides with shot of pistol.'? Bir. Apparently in consequence of this affair, there was, on the 27th, 'a strait proclamation,' discharging the wearing of culverins, dags, pistolets, or 'sic other firewerks,' with injunctions that any one contravening should be seized and subjected to summary trial, 'as gif they had committit recent slauchters.'? P. C. R.
This is the first of a series of street-fights by which the Hie Gait of Edinburgh was reddened during the reign of James VI, and which scarcely came to an end till his English reign was far advanced. It is worthy of note that sword and buckler were at this time the ordinary gear of gallant men in England? a comparatively harmless furnishing; but we see that small firearms were used in Scotland.
4 - Dec 23 1595
The king professed to be at this time scandalised at the state of the commonweal, 'altogether disorderit and shaken louss by reason of the deidly feids and controversies standing amangs his subjects of all degrees.' Seeing how murder had consequently become a daily occurrence, he resolved upon a new and vigorous effort to bring the hostile parties to a reconciliation 'by his awn pains and travel to that effect,' so that the country might be the better fitted to resist the common enemy, now threatening invasion. The Privy Council, therefore, ordained letters to be sent charging the various parties to make their appearance before the king on certain days, wherever he might be for the time, each accompanied by a certain number of friends who might assist with their advice, but the whole party in each case 'to keep their lodgings after their coming, while [till] they be specially sent for by his majesty.'
Alexander Lord Livingston, Sir Alexander Bruce, elder, of Airth, and Archibald Colquhoun of Luss, were one of the groups of protagonists summoned to appear before the King.
The nobles in every instance were allowed to have sixty, and the commoners twenty-four persons to accompany them to the place of agreement, and all, while attending, to have protection from any process of horning or excommunication which might have been previously passed upon them. Fire and sword was threatened against all neglecting to comply with the summons.
Earnest as the king seems now to have been, and influential as a royal tongue proverbially is, we know for certain that several of the parties now summoned continued afterwards at enmity. 
Bruce, Sir Alexander of Airth (I1291)
 
47 1 - 4th Earl, son of Colin, joined the first Covenant in 1557, he twice married [but appears to have had other partners at least one of whom provided natural children]
m1. - Lady Helen Hamilton, eldest daughter of James, Earl of Arran, mother of the 5th Earl
m2. - Lady Mary Graham, only daughter of William, third Earl of Menteith, mother of the 6th earl and two daughters, their daughter Janet married first Eachann Og Maclean of Duart and probably on the latter's death to Tormod MacLeod.
He must also have been married to Catherine Maclean, daughter of Hector (Mor ?) or Hector Og Maclean of Duart or rather Hector 12th Maclean of Duart .
In 1558 he sent a large fleet to Roag in the Isle of Skye to make a contract of marriage probably of one of his sons and Mary MacLeod. His expedition however was killed after having been entertained by Iain Dubh MacLeod, the usurping chief of the day.
There was a suspicion at the privy council, probably shared in by James V himself, that many of the disturbances in the Isles were secretly formented by the Argyll family, who in due course received the lands forfeited by the other chiefs. Alexander of Isla, being summoned to answer certain charges of Argyll, made his appearance at once, and gave in to the council a written statement, in which, among other things, he stated that the disturbed state of the Isles was mainly caused by the late Earl of Argyll and his brothers, Sir John Campbell of Calder, and Archibald Campbell of Skipnish. Archibald was summoned before James V, to give an account of the duties and rental of the Isles received by him, and was soon after his arrival imprisoned. He was liberated soon, but James V deprived him of the offices he still held in the Isles, some of which were bestowed on Alexander of Isla. After the death of James V he appears to have regained his authority over the Isles. He died in August 1558.

2 - Archibald Campbell, 4th of Argyll, m. as his second wife in 1541 to Lady Margaret Graham, dau of William Graham, 3rd Earl of Menteith and Margaret Cornwall, widow of John Cornwall of Bonhard and dau of John Moubray of Barbougle.
[https://www.genealogy.com/forum/surnames/topics/cornwall/251/] 
Campbell, Archibald 'red' 4th Earl of Argyll (I2132)
 
48 1 - 4th Earl, son of Colin, joined the first Covenant in 1557, he twice married [but appears to have had other partners at least one of whom provided natural children]
m1. - Lady Helen Hamilton, eldest daughter of James, Earl of Arran, mother of the 5th Earl
m2. - Lady Mary Graham, only daughter of William, third Earl of Menteith, mother of the 6th earl and two daughters, their daughter Janet married first Eachann Og Maclean of Duart and probably on the latter's death to Tormod MacLeod.
He must also have been married to Catherine Maclean, daughter of Hector (Mor ?) or Hector Og Maclean of Duart or rather Hector 12th Maclean of Duart .
In 1558 he sent a large fleet to Roag in the Isle of Skye to make a contract of marriage probably of one of his sons and Mary MacLeod. His expedition however was killed after having been entertained by Iain Dubh MacLeod, the usurping chief of the day.
There was a suspicion at the privy council, probably shared in by James V himself, that many of the disturbances in the Isles were secretly formented by the Argyll family, who in due course received the lands forfeited by the other chiefs. Alexander of Isla, being summoned to answer certain charges of Argyll, made his appearance at once, and gave in to the council a written statement, in which, among other things, he stated that the disturbed state of the Isles was mainly caused by the late Earl of Argyll and his brothers, Sir John Campbell of Calder, and Archibald Campbell of Skipnish. Archibald was summoned before James V, to give an account of the duties and rental of the Isles received by him, and was soon after his arrival imprisoned. He was liberated soon, but James V deprived him of the offices he still held in the Isles, some of which were bestowed on Alexander of Isla. After the death of James V he appears to have regained his authority over the Isles. He died in August 1558.

2 - Archibald Campbell, 4th of Argyll, m. as his second wife in 1541 to Lady Margaret Graham, dau of William Graham, 3rd Earl of Menteith and Margaret Cornwall, widow of John Cornwall of Bonhard and dau of John Moubray of Barbougle.
[https://www.genealogy.com/forum/surnames/topics/cornwall/251/] 
Campbell, Archibald 'red' 4th Earl of Argyll (I2132)
 
49 1 - A dispute arose between Thomas Fraser of Knockie, the brother of the late 5th Lord Lovat, and William Fraser of Struy (d. 1607), the young Lord's grand-uncle, as to who should exercise the much coveted duties of Tutor or guardian; the latter arguing that he had discharged the same trust on behalf of the late Lord. Party spirit was aroused, and Mr. Donald Dow Fraser [subsequently, 1592, parson of Wardlaw, but living at Fingask] hastened secretly to Beaufort to get Lady Lovat to intervene by asking Fraser of Struy to abandon his claims. The minister of Wardlaw later claimed that so far as she was concerned the visit was a failure, and the opposing parties settled their differences without her interference.
Another tradition puts the matter differently. Much as she respected him, she said that propriety and a sense of her own dignity forbade her intervention or presence at their meeting, seeing they had not considered her worthy of being consulted. She also said that if the worst should befall them and the sword should decide it, not a drop of Stewart blood would be shed. The minister was determined not to fail in his mission, but his anger was aroused by her answer. He unsheathed his dirk, the weapons of persuasion having failed, and declared that her own blood would be the first to flow if she did not send a message to the meeting. Awed by the attitude of the militant cleric, Lady Lovat wrote at once to William Fraser of Struy, who withdrew his claim, and Thomas Fraser of Knockie was appointed Tutor.

2 - "Queen Mary, in 1563, hunted and took her summer journeys in the west and south-west of Scotland; but her brother James, the new Earl of Moray, came north to Inverness late in the autumn, with his two brothers, to hold courts and consolidate his power, and there first put in execution the new Act against witchcraft, sorcery, and necromancy, by burning two old women as witches. On the 15th October 1563, Campbell of Cawdor was served heir before him as sheriff-principal by a jury, including of the family of the founder of the priory, William Fraser of Struy, uncle of Hugh Lord Lovat, now a minor;
[http://www.electricscotland.com/canada/fraser/beauly_priory.htm] 
Fraser, Andrew (later William) 1st of Struy (I13860)
 
50 1 - A dispute arose between Thomas Fraser of Knockie, the brother of the late 5th Lord Lovat, and William Fraser of Struy (d. 1607), the young Lord's grand-uncle, as to who should exercise the much coveted duties of Tutor or guardian; the latter arguing that he had discharged the same trust on behalf of the late Lord. Party spirit was aroused, and Mr. Donald Dow Fraser [subsequently, 1592, parson of Wardlaw, but living at Fingask] hastened secretly to Beaufort to get Lady Lovat to intervene by asking Fraser of Struy to abandon his claims. The minister of Wardlaw later claimed that so far as she was concerned the visit was a failure, and the opposing parties settled their differences without her interference.
Another tradition puts the matter differently. Much as she respected him, she said that propriety and a sense of her own dignity forbade her intervention or presence at their meeting, seeing they had not considered her worthy of being consulted. She also said that if the worst should befall them and the sword should decide it, not a drop of Stewart blood would be shed. The minister was determined not to fail in his mission, but his anger was aroused by her answer. He unsheathed his dirk, the weapons of persuasion having failed, and declared that her own blood would be the first to flow if she did not send a message to the meeting. Awed by the attitude of the militant cleric, Lady Lovat wrote at once to William Fraser of Struy, who withdrew his claim, and Thomas Fraser of Knockie was appointed Tutor.

2 - "Queen Mary, in 1563, hunted and took her summer journeys in the west and south-west of Scotland; but her brother James, the new Earl of Moray, came north to Inverness late in the autumn, with his two brothers, to hold courts and consolidate his power, and there first put in execution the new Act against witchcraft, sorcery, and necromancy, by burning two old women as witches. On the 15th October 1563, Campbell of Cawdor was served heir before him as sheriff-principal by a jury, including of the family of the founder of the priory, William Fraser of Struy, uncle of Hugh Lord Lovat, now a minor;
[http://www.electricscotland.com/canada/fraser/beauly_priory.htm] 
Fraser, Andrew (later William) 1st of Struy (I13860)
 

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